BLOG 35 / Excelente Argentina by steve joseph

Little drawings of the students, notes on the fable, their background and where they sit.

Little drawings of the students, notes on the fable, their background and where they sit.

Readers of my blog, please tell me when you are tired about hearing about the friendly and talented people in South America.  

I just finished a 5 day workshop in Buenos Aires, and would like to share some photos and highlights from the class. It was organized by Lourdes (of Lourdes Zenobi Glass Art), Paula Lekerman, and Claudia Golzman, who hosted the class in her large home and garden. 

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Not really sure where to start, I guess it is appropraite to thank the EZ Print company who generously donated packages of screens for the students to use. Here they are drying in the sun. We found the standard work better than the high res.

When I first met Lourdes, Paula and Claudia, they kept on talking about this mystery student named "Clara". For the first day her name was mentioned over and over again. Who could this popular Clara be??? I soon found out the term 'clara' means 'clear' and is used constantly.

Onward with the class...
The class was 5 days long, for 5 gentlemen and 7 lady students. Weeks before we met I gave each student a choice of three Aesop's fables to choose from, then we painted, atomized, printed and sand blasted glass and completed some fantastic stained glass panels using the Tiffany method. We had a huge kiln and at one point filled it up with three layer of shelving for an overnight firing.

Below are photos of all aspects of the class.. EXCEPT... I am saving the work these students made for one of my lecture I give when teaching. You can also see many on facebook. 

Unfortunately I didn't get any photos of the yoga breaks we took. But I did get one of the food!

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I don't want to be overly sentimental or "sappy", but this was truly my best class to date, not just because of the high quality of the students, but my immediate excitement seeing what they did with the techniques I taught.... oh, and there was an outpouring of love too! 

BLOG 34 / Speeches Bands and Tapioca: Inauguration Day in Itaparica! by steve joseph

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Tonight was THE big night for the first public lighting of my stained glass work. I really didn’t know what to expect but during the day, Augusto, the Program Manager here at the Sacatar Foundation, and Marcelo, the Media Publicists, kept on telling me certain things that ‘might’ happen... like there might be speeches and there might be music. 
     I arrived at the little park in front of the church at 5pm, to find a few sweet ladies sitting on the bench facing the church. They arrived early for the best seats in the house, and looked like they all knew each other. D. Cassimelia Pedreina, an elegantly dressed lady in a green dress and pearls stood out. 
     My one concern was to get inside the church to make sure the timer was set, and the lights would turn on at the set time of 6pm. The keys for the church could not be found, so Augusto and Marcelo were off on a motorcycle to get them back. 

D. Cassimelia Pedreina (in green) being interviewed by web-tv.

D. Cassimelia Pedreina (in green) being interviewed by web-tv.

While waiting I met friendly woman who was there from a local web-tv station. She was filming and interviewing people using her iPad, and she knew pretty good English. She introduced me around and told me the about D. Cassimelia Pedreina, who she just finished interviewing. D. Cassimelia is the local powerhouse who was the main organizer, along with Augusto, making things happen for my project in Itaparica. We had a short conversation with translating help of the web-tv woman.
     Soon a florist arrived and entered the side gate to the church with THE set of keys. I ran over, got the keys and told someone to phone Augusto and tell him to come back. 

A new arrangement of fresh flowers, palms inside the church.

A new arrangement of fresh flowers, palms inside the church.

I ran inside the church and checked the timer. It seemed right. The coordinator of the church opened the two large blue doors of the church, and had done a real beautiful new arrangement of statues, fresh flowers and small live palms behind the alter and set up a lovely small table right at the entrance to the church with Our Lady statue as the central figure and more flowers and plants. 
     There were for certain movers and shakers of Itaparica at this event, and I was introduced and photographed with them all including Mayor Marlyda Barbuda, the new female mayor, the outgoing mayor, people in the congregation of the church, and some locals I recognized.

François Starita interviewing D. Cassimelia Pedreina.

François Starita interviewing D. Cassimelia Pedreina.

So the timer is set, and I just have to circulate and meet people, which I enjoy. Throughout the night lots of strangers came up and introduced themselves, mainly in Portuguese, and asked if I made the work, then congratulated me with firm handshakes, kisses, hugs and placing their hands over their hearts. Wow, I didn’t expect to be able to meet so many of the people face-to-face that were following the progress here in Brazil and who were SO excited about the work, so for the next hour I did. Another web-tv person, François Starita, asked if I could explain about the work on video, and for the next 20 minutes I spoke with him. We spoke often throughout the night, He was a blond European, but also a dual citizen of Brazil who lived in town... he spoke perfect English. 
     Nice thing, both Marcelo, Sacatar’s Media Publicists and François Starita, will be putting together all this photo and video footage and will be sending it to me in the coming weeks. 

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By this time the square is filling up, at the most it was probably about 200 people. At this point we hear and see, I’m not kidding you, a marching band lead by a fantastic male baton twirler and flag team, marching toward us. All different aged students, lots of drums and brass, and super high energy. The square is not super huge, and they had a well rehearsed, very coordinated choreography figured out, to navigate the square in an inventive way while playing. They played a few songs then stop and stare up at the church.... I realize everyone in the square is looking up at the window. It is 6pm, the time the work should light.  
     Augusto runs to the back of the church to coordinate the ringing of the bells, and I run inside to manually switch the lights on. The timer will kick in soon, but I could not wait another minute. I switch it on and hear a combination of sounds... the eruption of applause, the band beginning to play, fireworks go off on the bay, and the bells ringing. In two seconds I was back in front, seeing everyone looking up, clapping and smiling. Definitely a goose bump moment. 

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Next it was time for speeches and more music. Talk about the Revolution and meaning about the work by three or four speakers. They really know the history here, and Itaparica was the where the battles were fought and won. I was asked to say something as well, so I thanked Sacatar and my friends back in the US for supporting the work, said something about being welcome in this beautiful community, and how it is not so often that art can make a difference in peoples lives. I then offered to seriously come back if they can find another church for me to work on, and put two thumbs up, which I thought a bit corny, but the crowd seemed to liked it. A very short and to the point speech, with Augusto translated for me. 
     Next D. Cassimelia Pedreina walked to the alter in the entrance of the church. I was on her side to help physically support her and her walker. She made a gesture of blessing. At some point a recording of the national anthem was played from the parked car that had  a sound system of speakers in the trunk. 

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Now the fun part! As the last of the speeches were finishing, a table appeared and a parade of trays of food and a huge pot of hot tapioca magically appeared through the front door of the church. Savory breads and sweet home made baked items of stacked treats for the crowd, along with soda. At some point I ws given a cup of hot tapioca and was handed a napkin with five different bread items, which I woofed down... Then had a second hot tapioca. Man that stuff is good! The crowd and the marching band were all fed and trays of food were passed around. There was only a little food left over, these very generous cooks have definitely done this before!
     Casual groups of friends formed and chatted for a bit. The marching band relaxed, the sound system played nice quiet music, including a song by the “Brazilian Elvis.” Soon the band reconfigured, started a new tune, and left the square by the same road from where they entered. It was sad to see them go, with the music fading down a side street. I was really enjoying this and after a year of planning and two months of work I didn’t want it to end, but it had to. I was so glad I planted the thought in the minds of the crowd to find me a church so I can return. My new dream is to do more permanent stained glass window projects like this one, around the world.
     I found some of my fellow residents and returned back to the Sacatar Foundation, where we heated up some lasagna that was left for us by our cook. Two more days here then an exciting teaching gig in Argentina.

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Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
The Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Sharon, Thomas & Anita, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie. 

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Information here on the Sacatar Foundation Residency.
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Help fund supplies for this Brazilian stained glass window by making a donation by writing a check. Please made the check out and mailed it to: Joseph Cavalieri, 216 East 7th Street, apt 10, New York, NY 10009, USA. Thank you for your support! - Joseph

BLOG 33 / BRAZILIAN CHURCH WINDOW PROJECT: STEP FIVE by steve joseph

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AFTER A YEAR of planning, carrying 100 pounds (45kg) of materials from New York to the island of Itaparica, and cutting and soldering 700 pieces of glass, the time for installation has arrived. I have about 10 days left in my residency so I am more than eager to have Our Lady in her final, very lofty location.
      One change of plans it to attach the glass to the frame up on the platform. If we did it on ground level, the window would be too heavy to hoist upwards.

TIMELINE FOR NOVEMBER 18, 2017: 

8:30 AM
In the images below you can see how the frame is roped, then hoisted to the wooden platform.

The location of Our Lady of Mercy Church is very public, with students, locals and tourist passing by.

The location of Our Lady of Mercy Church is very public, with students, locals and tourist passing by.

Filp-flops off, the bare feet of my assistants on the scaffolding.

Filp-flops off, the bare feet of my assistants on the scaffolding.

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11:00 AM:
My assistants from the Sacatar Foundation, fit the work temporally into the opening and decide we need a few heavy duty bolts to better attach the frame to the wall. Measuring and drilling go on until our lunch break, and because of the heat, we decide to return at 3pm.

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3:00 PM to 6:30 PM
We carefully hoist the 13 glass panels up to the platform, dividing them into four deliveries, then I climb up and join Charles Silva (of the Sacatar staff) and we meticulously connect the glass to the frame, using 66 bolts, our finger tips and a shared wrench. It is detailed work to do in the hot afternoon sun, and each added glass panel adds more weight to the structure.  We carefully turn the large wheel of glass and metal securing more panels, until after 3 hours final central panel is in place. The work is now weighing 90 pounds (40kg).
      The center image below is yellow because of the light change; it is 6pm and the sun was about to set. Raimundo da Silva joins Charles and I to help hold the work in place, while I attach the LED lighting to the back of the frame. Now the three of us move the work towards the wall, while a fourth person joins us on the platfrorm. It is the electrician who connects the live wire line to the LEDs.
      The LEDs are set on a timer. It will light from 6:00pm to midnight every night.

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7:00pm, by street light, we add the final connections securing the work to the church wall. Before climbing down, I am able to photograph Charles (below in red) and Raimundo in the last moments with Our Lady.
      Charles gives the image of Jesus a kiss before decending the scaffolding, and I give Our Lady a kiss as well.

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This framed xeroxed photo of the "Our Lady of Mercy" statue still hangs inside the church. It was placed there 6 years ago after the original statue was stolen. As of November 18, 2017, Our Lady has returned as a stained glass window, and overlooks the public square, the Bay of All Saints, and all of South America.

This framed xeroxed photo of the "Our Lady of Mercy" statue still hangs inside the church. It was placed there 6 years ago after the original statue was stolen. As of November 18, 2017, Our Lady has returned as a stained glass window, and overlooks the public square, the Bay of All Saints, and all of South America.

10AM the next morning I stop by and see the work in the daylight. Soon the scaffolding will be removed and we will have a commencement to introduce "Return of Our Lady" back to Itaparica. 

 ‘Return of Our Lady’ by day.

 ‘Return of Our Lady’ by day.

Soon I will stop by at dusk to take photos for my next and most likely final blog of this project.
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      Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
The Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Sharon, Thomas & Anita, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie. 
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Help fund supplies for this Brazilian stained glass window by making a donation by writing a check. Please made the check out and mailed it to: Joseph Cavalieri, 216 East 7th Street, apt 10, New York, NY 10009, USA. Thank you for your support! - Joseph

 

BLOG 32 / BRAZILIAN CHURCH WINDOW PROJECT: STEP FOUR by steve joseph

Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
The Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Sharon, Thomas & Anita, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie. If you are interested in supporting this project see the end of this blog. Thanks!!

My dear friend Paul in DC wants to see every step of this project, so this is dedicated to him. A short but important step was taken today, bringing the work to the church. We packed the glass, hired a truck, and carted if off on a very bumpy road to the church. Enjoy the photos Paul, and thanks again for housing me during my residency at the Torpedo Factory!

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BLOG 31 / Being a Writing Assignment at Providence Day School by steve joseph

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I was very pleased to have Edwin Gil as a student in my class at Pittsburgh Glass Center in 2017, and was very excited when he got a phone call during one of our dinners out, saying he was accepted as a professor at Providence Day School, a'global' college prep school in Charlotte, NC.

Months later he asked me to have a Skype interview with students from two of his art classes.

The students did an excellent job asking me questions about my art, and I hope to meet them in person for a lecture and demo at their school. Edwin actually made me a writing assignment for the class, and was nice enough to send me a few samples. Here are seven essays:

Joseph Cavalieri is an award winning New York glass artist. He has taught people how to airbrush, paint, and print on stained glass all over the world. His work is apart of many museums around the world. Joseph Cavalieri focuses most on gallery exhibitions and private/public art commissioners. Even though he had a brain tumor and had brain surgery he won’t let that stop him from making beautiful art. 
     Joseph Cavalieri was a magazine designer for the People magazine when he found out he wanted to be an artist. Some of his sisters are artist. He was introduced to glass work after two of his five sisters took classes. He was then re-introduced to glass work by UrbanGlass. When he was a little boy in Kindergarten he would always draw the most incredible things his teacher noticed and supported his art. Joseph works in his studio most of the time cutting and painting glass. His studio is on East Village where it reminds him of his favorite type of art medieval Europe. He believes he was born in the wrong century. 
     Joseph Cavalieri spends his time in his studio designing, creating, and cutting. Joseph tries to push concept behind his art work. He started to add LED lights behind the artwork so the customers can see it at night and during the day. He says seeing the light go through the colored glass memorizes people. Each time I do a sketch I put in a folder so I can come back to it for ideas. He thinks of art as a profession not a hobby because that is what he does full time. He likes to show his work and talk about his work in public. - Mary Linda
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I think that Joseph Cavalieri is a wonderful artist and when we Skyped him he seemed to be a pretty cool guy, here’s what I think makes him a great artist and a professional artist nonetheless.
Joseph Cavalieri has permanent work in 5 museums, and he teaches classes all over the United States such as Brooklyn, NY. I think that that is very nice of him because now others can learn the beauty of art through his work and that will make for a very successful career path for him.
I also now look up to Mr. Cavalieri because when you met him and he was your mentor, he really inspired you to become an artist that already were, but you just had not completely come out of your shell yet. 
     Over all Joseph Cavalieri is a very successful artist and I would to Skype, see his work, or talk more and closer about the work Joseph Cavalieri does and how. - Mauren
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I think Joseph Cavalieri was an interesting artist to talk to. It was cool that we got to FaceTime him and get his perspective on things. His technique is fascinating and amazing at the same time.
A few things I enjoy about his art is that he works with LED lights which I think is pretty cool. It is almost as if it is a night light that can totally change the perspective of the the panting. I also like that he shows the buyers what he wants to do and see if they like it. I think that it is a smart idea to do that.
     His are in general is actually very impressing. It has many different colors of glass and lots of detail. I think it is cool that he took advantage of his graphic designing skills and great cutting skills to perform amazing pieces of art. - Karishma
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Joseph Cavalieri is a native New Yorker who works with glass. He created a unique and new way of using stained glass
     Joseph Cavalieri uses a very unique technique. He uses L.E.D. lights so you can look at the art whenever you want, even when it’s nighttime. He also incorporates humor, like including characters from The Simpson’s T.V. Show to make it funny. Sometimes he also makes it religious but humorous as well. 
     I think Joseph Cavalieri’s art is very unique and shows who he is. I like the type of art he does because it is beautiful and very cool. - Millie
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I think he’s a very talented person and his art work is very creative and his ideas are super smart. He does art projects for other witch is really kind. I hope his art work can expand and hope he does bigger projects. - Michael
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I really like the technique he uses to create his pieces because the method of installing lights behind the glass is really practical and would be handy for people without many windows. I also think it's nice how he can turn super cool digital art into a real piece. It inspires me because he mixes two types of art together to make this really cool piece. - Naomi
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I think that Joseph Cavaliers is a cool artist. I love his art and someday I would like to do glass to. I cannot get over how talented he is with his art. The one in piece of glass that I liked is when he did all the LED lights in so you can see it at night.
     Joseph technique is very cool. His approach to his glass is very chilled back, also just to get things right. I liked the way that he talked to us about cutting glass it is so cool that a little diamond can do so much. Then the way that the clamp thing can just break it is so cool, just in the way that you want it.
     I would love to meet Joseph one day. I would love to talk to him on how to get started on glass. It would be cool to know how he got his inspiration on his art. He is a very cool artist and I would love to meet him one day. - Emerson

BLOG 30 / Brazilian Church Window Project: Step Three by steve joseph

Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
The Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Sharon, Thomas & Anita, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie. If you are interested in supporting this project see the end of this blog. Thanks!!

This is my third blog on my Brazilian stained glass project. The 10 photos below show the process during the last two weeks making the 13 panels here in my workspace at the Sacatar Foundation. All in on schedule.
At this point all panels are finished and we are waiting for scaffolding to be built in front of the church to climb up and access the opening. Once there we will connect the LED lights, hang the frame, then place the glass inside the frame. We will have the LED lights on a timer so the work is lit at night. 

Copper foil on the edge of the glass, before soldering.

Copper foil on the edge of the glass, before soldering.

Cleaning the central panel after soldering.

Cleaning the central panel after soldering.

The paper sketch for the 12 outer panels. Medieval artists named this paper drawing a "cartoon".

The paper sketch for the 12 outer panels. Medieval artists named this paper drawing a "cartoon".

Transparent and opaque glass is cut to size on top of the "cartoon".

Transparent and opaque glass is cut to size on top of the "cartoon".

One fully soldered stained glass panel. The uneven edges will be blocked by the stainless steel frame.

One fully soldered stained glass panel. The uneven edges will be blocked by the stainless steel frame.

Blue sky and glass.

Blue sky and glass.

Production line of the 12 outside stained glass panels.

Production line of the 12 outside stained glass panels.

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joseph cavalieri
And finally photo number 10. All of the glass panels laid on top of the stainless steel frame.

And finally photo number 10. All of the glass panels laid on top of the stainless steel frame.

Please help by making a donation by mailing me a check, made out and mailed to:
Joseph Cavalieri, 216 East 7th Street, apt 10, New York, NY 10009, USA. Thank you for your support! - Joseph

BLOG 29 / My View of the Torpedo Factory Visiting Artist Residency by steve joseph

Here is some advice to artists considering applying to the Torpedo Factory Visiting Artist. I was selected for a month long residency, one in 2014 and one in 2017.

Like all residencies, first consider WHY you want to do a residency. My list includes possibilities for:
- a new environment with abundant time with no distractions to concentrate on your art
- contact, learning and sharing with other artists
- a new environment to research, or perfect a technique
- a new environment to take a break from being an artist
- a place to make collaboration with another artist or group of artists
- immediate and future exhibition possibilities
- possibilities for a permanent installation
- education and learning experiences
- exposure to new cultures
- you always wanted to visit this part of the country / world
- exposure to the public
- sales
(If you have any to add please email me)

The TFAA Visiting Artist Program is described as:
"Visiting artists become part the community of more than 275 active artists affiliated with the Torpedo Factory Art Center.  With space in one of the 82 publicly accessible working studios, artists can display and sell original work while interacting with summer visitors.

MY ADVICE
1. The best part of this residency was having a space to concentrate on my work. I had time and completed a few commissions.
2. I had only a couple of sales during my two residencies, both to friends in the DC area. If sales are important to you I would recommend a visit or a few conversations with existing artists that sell work similar to your work, or find them online and ask them to be upfront with the amount of sales. Most visitors are having an enjoyable day out seeing art and getting a meal. I noticed jewellery was a big seller.
2. If you want to make work you have to be able to make your work and have a conversation with visitors at the same time. Not a problem here. 
3. You have to like talking with retired people, families and children. There are lots visiting.
4. You should be okay with selling other artists work. You are using 1/2 of an existing studio with your art and art from other artists. They are away while you are there so you have full run of the space. You should be good with answering questions on your studio mates work and ringing up sales. This will be rehearsed when you arrive, and you can always phone the other artists if you have questions.
5. The most busy hours are on the weekend. 
6. You have access to other practicing artists. Make time to meet as many as you can.
7. There are changes happening with the ownership of the Factory, that is on people's minds. Everyone has a different opinion.
8. I noticed many studios didn't open at 10am, so early visitors were often walking around the Factory with no access the the art. 
9. The staff and other artists at the Factory are extremely helpful, thanks for the great visit!
10. I especially like the staff of the Art League Gallery. They have a new show every month.
11. You can use the space just about anytime. Some of my most productive hours were after 6pm when the building was closed.
12. You have to pay for your own housing and for use of the studio. The Factory is set in a beautiful historic area, a 20 minute walk to the Metro, then it is 1/2 an hour ride to downtown Washington DC, with lots of free museums.

Hope this helps any future artist considering a Visiting Artist Residency.

BLOG 28 / BRAZILIAN CHURCH WINDOW PROJECT: STEP TWO by steve joseph

Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
The Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Thomas & Anita, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie.

Political protesters.

Political protesters.

This is my second blog on my Brazilian stained glass project.. starting out with a photo of some colorful protestors (above). The Sacatar Foundation, who is hosting me along with 5 other art residents, has a great program that introduces us to the local region and customs. For the first 4 days we had mini van trips to the city of Salvador, and our island of Itaparica and (above) local towns.

Fellow Art Residents: (L-R) Glab Skubachevskiy (Russian), Mauricio Adinolfi (Brazilian), Pedro Henrique Lemes Da Silva (Brazilian) and Bruce Odland (New York).

Fellow Art Residents:

(L-R) Glab Skubachevskiy (Russian), Mauricio Adinolfi (Brazilian), Pedro Henrique Lemes Da Silva (Brazilian) and Bruce Odland (New York).

These mini van trips are a very good way to get to know the artist you will be living and working around for the next 2 months. It is day number 11, and I already know they are a very creative and inspirational group.

(Clockwise from top left) Rebuilding the frame, stained glass central image, my work space at the Sacatar Froundation, and the inside of the Nossa Senhora da Piede church.

(Clockwise from top left) Rebuilding the frame, stained glass central image, my work space at the Sacatar Froundation, and the inside of the Nossa Senhora da Piede church.

After all the tours, it was time to unpack and re-assemble the stainless steel frame, and the 40 pounds of glass I had in my carry on. I had painted and fired the image of Nossa Senhora onto white stained glass, when I was teaching at Penland School of Craft, so the central panel was where I decided to start. It is totally finished now (on day 11), and I am well into production of the 12 side panels. 
I was also able to see inside the church, and inspect the electrical connection. The plan is to have LED lighting behind the art that will be on a timer starting daily at 6pm, and turning off around 10pm.
To end this 2nd blog is a image of the outside of the newly painted church (below).
Please help by making a donation by mailing me a check, made out and mailed to:
Joseph Cavalieri, 216 East 7th Street, apt 10, New York, NY 10009, USA. Thank you for your support! - Joseph

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BLOG 27 / BRAZILIAN CHURCH WINDOW PROJECT: Step ONE in NYC by steve joseph

AUGUST 2017: My approved digital design for “Return of Nossa Senhora,” a stained glass window for the Nossa Senhora da Piedade Church in Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil.

AUGUST 2017: My approved digital design for “Return of Nossa Senhora,” a stained glass window for the Nossa Senhora da Piedade Church in Itaparica, Bahia, Brazil.

(l-r) Google earth image of the Church, measuring the window, and the church from the distance, with my (digital) design.

(l-r) Google earth image of the Church, measuring the window, and the church from the distance, with my (digital) design.

SEPTEMBER 2017: Renovation of the front of Our Lady of Mercy church.

SEPTEMBER 2017: Renovation of the front of Our Lady of Mercy church.

After the window area was measured and design was approved, my favorite metal company in Brooklyn made the stainless steel frame. It comes apart into 13 pieces. 

After the window area was measured and design was approved, my favorite metal company in Brooklyn made the stainless steel frame. It comes apart into 13 pieces. 

Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
The Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Thomas & Anita, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie.

Please help by making a donation by mailing me a check, made out and mailed to:
Joseph Cavalieri, 216 East 7th Street, apt 10, New York, NY 10009, USA. Thank you for your support! - Joseph

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I am Joseph Cavalieri, a New York City artist. I am currently designing and making a six foot round stained glass window for Our Lady of Mercy Church in Itaparica, an island off the city of Salvador, Brazil.

The Church was built in 1923, with an area for a stained glass window. At that time, the members of the Church could not afford to include a stained glass window; today the cost is even more prohibitive. However, with design approval from the head of the Church, I am volunteering my time and creativity to provide the long overdue window while Sacatar Foundation is contributing a much appreciated work space, housing and meals for me. Despite all of this cooperation, I still need funds for purchase of the stainless steel frame, glass, solder, and lighting. 

I will be spending October and November of this year in Itaparica to make and install the window. I will be adding to this blog with photos and information on the project.

HERE IS SOME BACKGROUND

I was initially invited to the Sacatar Foundation for a two month visiting artist residency in 2011, where I taught beginner stained glass classes to the locals

I was initially invited to the Sacatar Foundation for a two month visiting artist residency in 2011, where I taught beginner stained glass classes to the locals

ABOUT THE ART:
This is a decorative design with a central figure of Nossa Senhora da Piedade (Our Lady of Mercy). It has strong colors so you will see it clearly from the distance. It is made of colored stained glass that will be set into a stainless steel metal frame. It will be back lit with LED lighting. The blue glass color relates to water, ocean, sky, and the color of the front door. The orange and yellow colors relate to the sun and the color of the outside of the church. The border has waves of water to relate to the ocean.

The central figure is a portrait of the original Our Lady of Mercy statue that was stolen from the church in 2011. This stained glass window is a way to bring her back to the church and the community of Itaparica. Our Lady of Mercy is the Patroness of Itaparica. This work relates to the history of this Neogothic style church. The location is in the historical center of Itaparica, and island off of Salvador Brazil, in the state of Bahia (population 55,000, area:146 km / 56 sq mi). The original construction was in 1854. The church was rebuilt in 1923.

Our Lady of Mercy had fought to defend Itaparica. For that reason she became the patroness of Itaparica and the first chapel in honor of her was built in 1923. This chapel was built as a monument of gratitude to Nossa Senhora and the independence heroes, whose names are written on the church facade.

THANK YOU
Special thanks to the following for supporting this project:
Sacatar Foundation, Greg, Archie, Stan, Thomas & Annette, Dita & Dave, Fred & Susan, Cousin Midge, Cousin Connie, Bob, James, Jennifer, Seth & Sarah, Fred & Sharon, and HITlights LED, and last but not least my family: Peppy-Jo, Rita, Patty, and Johnny & Annie.

Please help by making a donation by mailing me a check, made out and mailed to:
Joseph Cavalieri, 216 East 7th Street, apt 10, New York, NY 10009, USA. Thank you for your support! - Joseph

BLOG 26 / Recent work: The Granier by steve joseph

This blog shows some new techniques and many photos of a recent collaboration and commission for a client here in New York. 

NO SURPRISES: 2 glass samples. A portion of the work I showed the clients for approval.

NO SURPRISES: 2 glass samples. A portion of the work I showed the clients for approval.

Past students may remember a demonstration in class where I used oil paints on stained glass. This "The Granier" commission, French for the Baker, was a perfect project to demonstrate this technique. My steps included:
- Meeting the clients to see the location for the art to be hung and observe the colors of the room
- Reviewing possible themes, schedule and price
- Presenting small digital sketches
- Choice and revisions on digital sketch
- Presenting a full-size color paper printout of the design in different sizes to choose which looked best in the room.
- Presenting a glass sample (see image above)
- Drop off and hang final work

Images of the final work:

joseph_Cavalieri_T&A_detail2_LR.jpg

The work measures about 20 x 20 inches, and is set into a stainless steel frame with LED backlighting.