North, South & Home
       
     
North, South & Home
       
     
Glass Seurat
       
     
Sanscriti Commission
       
     
Cinderella
       
     
Octagon House
       
     
Jackie
       
     
Brooklyn & Manhattan Landscapes
       
     
The 4 Seasons
       
     
Madonna & Prada
       
     
Earth Cross
       
     
 (Detail)    These sliding doors front a wardrobe inside an apartment of the International Tailoring Company Building, at 111 4th Avenue in New York City. The design is a historic print of a suit that was actually made inside this building, and the company logo which still is carved on the front of the building. The International Tailoring Company Building was built in 1925, and designed by Starrett & Van Vleeck.     Measurements: 5 feet wide x 7 feet tall (152 x 213 cm)    Private commission 2015
       
     
Gormenghast
       
     
Gormenghast
       
     
Earth Cross
       
     
North, South & Home
       
     
North, South & Home

To see image full screen, click (+) in top right of photo.

A GENTLE HUDSON WHISTLE
BEGINS MY JOURNEY
NORTH AND SOUTH AND HOME

MTA Arts for Transit commissions public art that is seen by hundreds of thousands of city-dwellers as well as national and international visitors who use the New York City Transit, Metro-North Railroad, Long Island Rail Road, and Bridges & Tunnels. As the MTA rehabilitates subway and commuter rail stations through its Capital Program, it uses a portion of the funds to install permanent works of art. Arts for Transit’s projects create links to neighborhoods with art that echoes the architectural history and design context of the individual stations. Both well-established and emerging artists add to a growing collection of works created in the materials of the system -mosaic, ceramic, tile, bronze, steel and glass. 

Image: MTA Commission at Philipse Manor Station
2010
Height: 42 inches (106 cm) each
Photo Credit: Veronica Sharon

North, South & Home
       
     
North, South & Home

 

“The tree is a classic representation of family and community. This tree is mature, flowering and extremely healthy. Like a tree, a community has a multitude of branches and roots bringing together people of different backgrounds and ages. This tree also relates to the Metro North route, traveling north and south. At the base of the tree trunk is an outline in the shape of Philipsburg Manor. The border is formed from dutch tile design, showing the Dutch history of the community, while the bottom semi circles represent autumnal rolling hills of Westchester. Philipse Manor is a very classy stop on Metro North. I like to call it “Versailles on the Hudson”. This design brings a sophisticated and polished look to the overpass and elegantly connects the station to the natural environment.”

He continues “My main concern was to make art that commuters would enjoy seeing everyday. A colorful design that would greet them in the morning and warmly welcome them home at night.”

Joseph’s inspiration for this design comes from historic dutch tiles, and the tradition of elaborate entrances of great train stations in Europe, especially the art nouveau design in the Paris subway. Yet, he adds an contemporary artisan feel with the uneven curvaceous wild branches. The tree shape comes from his imagination, the round blooms are an abstraction of geranium flowers, and the curvy branches intentionally look like Victorian gates, relating to Victorian homes in Westchester. The blue tree is placed over a gradient orange-yellow background, a beautiful color combination that creates a contrast to make this read easily from afar. 

PRODUCTION: The MTA Arts for Transit department is an extremely organized group of people. Once the artist is chosen, an easy to follow scope of work schedule is given to the artist. Joseph choose/chose the manufacturer Willet Hauser Architectural Glass Inc. in Winona MN. A schedule was set, the design redrawn to exact measurements of the windows, and Willet Hauser started to create these designs to size (33 x 42 inches each panel). Faceted glass is about one inch thick and is cut by huge saws. Between the glass pieces is black epoxy, which expands and contracts in different temperatures. Since this panel is outdoors and just feet away from the Hudson river, it needs to withstand temperatures range from over 100 degrees to under freezing.  

Samples of colors were discussed and painting samples were created by Willet Hauser. Once these were approved a 18 x 18” section was created and sent to the MTA offices. This sample showed all the colors and painting styles that would be used on the full 6 panels. The next step was to start cutting the glass and painting the individual pieces. Cavalieri visited the manufacturer to paint sections of the glass himself.  

WILLET HAUSER VISIT: Joseph arrived in Winona, MN, and drove directly to Willet Hauser to start painting during his two day visit. A couple of full size color copies of his design were laid out, with the inch-thick glass cut to size and set on top. The staff is extremely talented, they gave a tour and set up a light table for Cavalieri to paint the glass. Since Joseph is familiar with glass they put him to work to paint sections of the panel, something they normally don’t allow “Arts for Transit” artist. Joseph says, “The nice thing about this project is the professionals at Willet Hauser cut and painted most all of the inch thick glass. During my visit I approved the layouts and hand painted some of the glass. Once each piece of glass is kiln fired they poured black epoxy between the pieces. This permanently bonds the glass.” During Joseph’s visit to Winona he arranged a visiting artist lecture at Winona State University to art students about his magazine background, his glass business and this MTA glass project. 

INSTILLATION: When all 6 panels were complete they were driven to the Philipse Manor station in Westchester, New York.  September 2009, they were unloaded, and inspected for any breakage. They all arrived perfectly, and the next day were installed in the windows, with each panel lifted by two men and set into the windows. About three months, in December 2009, the overpass was opened to the public.

TRIBUTE: Since the start of this project Joseph realized the importance of a permanent instillation of this size. He sees it as a way of giving back to the community, and paying homage to his roots. He personally dedicates this to parents, Catherine and John Cavalieri.

Cavalieri says: “From the overpass you can see the Tappan Zee Bridge. My grandfather Stanislau Mosiello lived in Tarrytown and watched the bridge being built from the family’s kitchen window. My Uncle Toby would drive him down to the shore to watch the progress. Grandpa Mosiello was an avid walker and was excited for the day he would be able to walk the complete expanse of the bridge. The day before the bridge opened to the public in 1955, my grandfather passed away. Now grandparents, my father and many aunts and uncles are buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. This is my personal homage to these relatives, a way of connecting their spirits to the Hudson, and a tribute for people living in this graceful community as they travel north, south and home.” 

Image: MTA Commission at Philipse Manor Station (detail)
2010
Height: 42 inches (106 cm) each
Photo Credit: Veronica Sharon

(MTA video)

Glass Seurat
       
     
Glass Seurat

Read the blog on the making of this work. This commission is based on a conté crayon drawing by French post-Impressionist painter Georges Seurat (1859- 1891). The figure is an study of figure that was later used in Seurat's popular painting titled "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte" (1884). This glass version is made of 20 double layered, fused glass panels, which are set into an existing back lit wall, between the kitchen and living space. The black areas of the glass has texture. 

Size: 57 x 67 (144 x 170 cm) 2016

Translated, produced and installed by Joseph Cavalieri.  
Private commission.

Sanscriti Commission
       
     
Sanscriti Commission

Artwork designed, produced and installed during Cavalieri's Art Residency at the Sanskriti Kendra Foundation in Delhi, India. The horses relate to the life sized ceramic horses on the property of the foundation. Formal gardens are seen through the clear sections of the glass.

Size: 30 x 40 inches (76 x 100 cm) 2010

Cinderella
       
     
Cinderella

(private commission) Magical characters of Cinderella, her fairy godmother and the magical pumpkin carriage come from an existing antique slide. They are combined on stage in front of an audience of muscle men. 

Medium: Hand painted and air-brushed enamels kiln fired on glass,
LED lights, wooden frame

Size: 23 x 23 x 2 1/2 inches (59 x 29 x 7 cm)

Date: 2015

Octagon House
       
     
Octagon House

(private commission) The Armour-Stiner House, a classical, elaborately detailed private home in Irvirngton, New York. This image of the house is from a 1882 photo, and was done as a private commission for the current owners of the home. 

Medium: Silk screened and air-brushed enamels kiln fired on glass,
LED lights, stainless steel frame

Size: 14 3/4 x 16 x 1 inches (38 x40 x 3 cm)

Date 2015

Jackie
       
     
Jackie

This commission honors Jacqueline “Jackie” Lee Bouvier Kennedy Onassis. First Lady, fashion setter, leader of the historic preservation campaign to prevent demolition of historic buildings including New York’s Grand Central Terminal. This work celebrates the Chanel suits that she was know for elegantly popularizing in the 1960’s. The work is illuminated by natural light during the day, and LED at night, and is set into a hinged door to allow access to the window.  
2014
Height: 55 inches (140 cm)

Brooklyn & Manhattan Landscapes
       
     
Brooklyn & Manhattan Landscapes

This commission is made of opaque glass and has an illustration of the Empire State Building on the top half, and the Brooklyn Bridge on the bottom half. The illustrations are set into a ornate frame (within the glass design), and have a patterned background surrounding them. This is a classic and ornate design, with the background pattern matches the shape of the floor tiles. The work is illuminated by natural light during the day, and LED at night, and is set into a hinged door to allow access to the window.  
2014
Height: 55 inches (140 cm)

The 4 Seasons
       
     
The 4 Seasons

(click "+" in the top right of photo to enlarge) This commission is set into a southern facing window of a home on Central Park West in Manhattan, just two blocks south of the Dakota. The client suggested the theme of the four seasons. The top panel shows 'winter', with a barren tree with hanging snowflakes, followed by a yellow panel representing 'spring', with a blossoming tree. Next is 'summer', with hanging sunglasses, and 'fall' with apples.

It is made using hand painted and silk-screened imagery that is kiln fired onto the surface of stained glass. The glass pieces are soldered together, and set into a stainless steel frame. 

The work is illuminated by natural light during the day, and LED at night.  
2015
Height: 72 inches (183 cm)

Madonna & Prada
       
     
Madonna & Prada

"Madonna & Prada” was added to the permanent collection of the Museum of Arts and Design (NYC) in 2013.

This multiple layered stained glass triptych tells the story of a modern day Madonna and her favorite accessories. Traditional religious paintings typically shows Madonna caressing the Baby Jesus. The Christ Child is replaced with a Gothic version of a Prada shoe. Within the work other accessories beautifully collide with medieval architecture and clothing in this hand painted stained glass window which is set into a light box. This work illustrates the story of how Madonna would live now, in the 21st century, and questions has fashion replaced motherhood?

The central figure is modeled after Paris Hilton.

The process of working with the collections committee at MAD started with presenting 5 different designs, and continued with revisions until the work was approved.

Size: 36 x 17 1/4 x 4 1/4
Hand painted kiln fired enamel on glass set into a stainless steel light box with LED lighting.

Earth Cross
       
     
Earth Cross

This commission illustrates Cavalieri is interest in agriculture on other planets. He interview Italian scientist Stefano Mancuso to see what type of plant would be first harvested on the moon. “When the time will come that we will move on (the) Moon, then we will build big special greenhouse able to maintain temperature and oxygen at level compatible with the life; at that moment, in principle, (it) will be possible to cultivate any plant, or at least the more efficient in producing biomass as maize.” says Mancuso.

In “Earth Cross”  Joseph decides to show mature trees, representing a time past the introduction of maize, when plantings and construction are more developed, all seen through a religious porthole viewing mother earth. The rhythms of plants are in tune with tides, rainfall and the cycles of the heavens, even when they are living in that heaven.

2011, Height: 32 inches (81cm)

See video of this work here.

 (Detail)    These sliding doors front a wardrobe inside an apartment of the International Tailoring Company Building, at 111 4th Avenue in New York City. The design is a historic print of a suit that was actually made inside this building, and the company logo which still is carved on the front of the building. The International Tailoring Company Building was built in 1925, and designed by Starrett & Van Vleeck.     Measurements: 5 feet wide x 7 feet tall (152 x 213 cm)    Private commission 2015
       
     

(Detail) 

These sliding doors front a wardrobe inside an apartment of the International Tailoring Company Building, at 111 4th Avenue in New York City. The design is a historic print of a suit that was actually made inside this building, and the company logo which still is carved on the front of the building. The International Tailoring Company Building was built in 1925, and designed by Starrett & Van Vleeck. 

Measurements: 5 feet wide x 7 feet tall (152 x 213 cm)

Private commission 2015

Gormenghast
       
     
Gormenghast

(detail) This commission is based on novels by Mervyn Peake and is made of kiln fired enamel on layered stained glass.

"The cats approaching the viewer, the trickling blood and the castle; always difficult to portray as it is famous for its non-specificity, are all given idiosyncratic and original treatment" – Sebastian Peake (Mervyn's son) June 2009

Height: 48 3/4 inches (124 cm)

Gormenghast
       
     
Gormenghast

This commission is based on novels by Mervyn Peake and is made of kiln fired enamel on layered stained glass.

"The cats approaching the viewer, the trickling blood and the castle; always difficult to portray as it is famous for its non-specificity, are all given idiosyncratic and original treatment" – Sebastian Peake (Mervyn's son) June 2009

Height: 48 3/4 inches (124 cm)

Earth Cross
       
     
Earth Cross

(detail) This commission illustrates Cavalieri is interest in agriculture on other planets. He interview Italian scientist Stefano Mancuso to see what type of plant would be first harvested on the moon. “When the time will come that we will move on (the) Moon, then we will build big special greenhouse able to maintain temperature and oxygen at level compatible with the life; at that moment, in principle, (it) will be possible to cultivate any plant, or at least the more efficient in producing biomass as maize.” says Mancuso.

In “Earth Cross”  Joseph decides to show mature trees, representing a time past the introduction of maize, when plantings and construction are more developed, all seen through a religious porthole viewing mother earth. The rhythms of plants are in tune with tides, rainfall and the cycles of the heavens, even when they are living in that heaven.

2011, Height: 32 inches (81cm)

See video of this work here.